Category Archives: Rabbit

Finding a Wild Baby Rabbit: What to Do?

Photo and article courtesy of http://www.myhouserabbit.com

If you happen to spot a wild baby rabbit in your yard, your first instinct might be to “rescue” the poor, defenseless creature and care for it in your home.

However, to ensure the little bunny’s best chance for survival, the best action you can take is to leave it alone. It is important to note that wild baby rabbits are not suitable pets and should not be thought of as such.

Rabbit nests are often built in plain sight, sometimes in the middle of a backyard.

They are constructed of fur, grass, and brush. Mother rabbits will only spend a few minutes a day nursing their young; the rest of the day, the babies are on their own in the nest.

Baby rabbits, or kits, have less chance of survival if they are removed from their nest or if you move the nest elsewhere. That said, if you have already picked up a baby bunny, you can return it to it’s nest – the sooner, the better. The rabbit mother will still accept the kit even if it has been handled by a human.

If the nest is destroyed, you can rebuild it and move the kits into it. You can also move a nest within a few feet of where you found it if it is located in a dangerous spot (such as where a lawnmower is often used).

In the case where the mother of the baby bunnies has been killed or there are no signs of her for several days in a row, it is acceptable to call a wildlife rehabilitator. Wildlife rehabilitators have been trained to take care of wild animals that are injured or otherwise cannot care for themselves.

Advertisements

Rabbit Dating Services

Photo courtesy of http://www.petrescue.com

If you are considering a companion bunny for your existing rabbit a free bunny date can be organised at Rabbit Run-devous. Not all bunnies get along, so a new program from Rabbit Runaway Orphanage offers a free bunny dating service to find the right companion bunny for your bunny. Plus, you’ll be helping some orphan rabbits make new friends. 

Rabbits are social animals and when matched with the right friend they are more contented, less susceptible to stress and become much happier Bunnies.

All orphan bunnies are vaccinated and desexed.

If your bunny is particularly hard to bond, we can keep them together overnight at a small charge of $15 a night.

For more information, see http://www.rabbitrunaway.org.au

Do you have a special tale of animal friendship you would like to share with other pet lovers? Why not create your own website with Living Years Pets; an easy to create, affordable and highly engaging website to celebrate your beloved pets. It will allow family, friends and colleagues, from around the world, to communicate and frequently relive precious memories forever.

Rabbit Noises – What They Mean

Rabbits are generally quiet animals, but they are not completely silent. They make plenty of noises from growling to screaming, to communicate how they feel. Here’s how to decipher them…

Growling

If your rabbit growls or grunts at you, she’s not happy about something. Maybe she’s angry that you’re poking your hand into her cage, and she doesn’t want you in her territory. Growling can be a sign of anger, fear, uncertainty and stress. The better you get to know your bunny, the more you’ll discover what her different growls mean.

Crying

Your bunny may cry. Sometimes a bunny will let out a little cry or whimper and thump their back feet. This is interpreted much as you would understand the same noise in puppies or people.

Licking

If your bunny licks your face or your hands, be happy. She’s telling you I love you!

Screaming

You never want to hear your bunny scream. A bunny scream is usually shrill. It’s a heart-breaking sound, and it generally signifies your bunny is either hurt or dying. You’ll want to get her help immediately.

Flopping

Your bunny is on top of the world. She is so happy, she can think of no better way to show her happiness than flopping over, eyes closed, taking some time to relax.

Binkying

You’ve got one happy bunny on your hands. She’s gyrating, dancing, hopping high in the air and shooting across the room at lightening speed. She’s so happy she’s a bunny and living with you.

Thumping

Your bunny will thump her back legs for a number of reasons including fear, anger and warning you to danger lurking.

The Bunny 500

It’s 6 a.m., and the Bunny 500 has taken off again. Your bunny or bunnies are in their room, when all of a sudden, zoom! They race around the room over and over again at top bunny speed, until they’re ready to just chill out, munch on some hay, chew the phone book or flop down for a much-needed nap.

Chinning

Your bunny is rubbing her chin all over the furniture, the book you’re reading and you. This is just her way of marking her territory. She’s saying, hey, this is mine.

Advice: You may search Google for “rabbit noises”. This will give you many links to related articles.

Article and photo courtesy http://www.myhouserabbit.com.

Do you have a pet whose quirky traits you would like to share with other pet lovers? Why not create your own website with Living Years Pets; an easy to create, affordable and highly engaging website to celebrate your beloved pets. It will allow family, friends and colleagues, from around the world, to communicate and frequently relive precious memories forever.